Overview


The hunt for the world’s very first aerial hijacking at the hands of rogue Japanese agents before World War II comes to a head on the exotic shores of Micronesia. A never before told story is revealed in startling details that span nearly eighty years and, if solved, could rewrite history as we know it.

Well before World War II, Japan was already at war in China. The Chinese community within the United States made great efforts and personal sacrifices to help defend their homeland from a desperately brutal Japanese invasion. Restaurateur Choy Wah Sun, together with his brother and fellow countrymen, raised over $3 million ($49 million in value today) to buy fighter aircraft and defend their homeland. Transporting the money would be dangerous but the safest and quickest way to travel from the US to Hong Kong was via the Concord of its day, Pan American China Clippers. While Choy was warned not to go, he took the risk and, as the legend goes, was captured and executed between Guam and the Philippines. Now, if the legend is to be shown true – of how the world’s most famous and safest flying boat had disappeared without a trace – it was actually an act of sabotage and murder, then the proof is ready to be uncovered.

Lost Clipper in Toronto Canada
Guy and Jeff in Toronto Canada December 13, 2014

Retired Navy Officer and Emmy Winning Producer, Guy Noffsinger, and his team have partnered with renowned investigative detectives, Steve Murphy and Javier Pena – the men who hunted down and found the infamous drug lord, Pablo Escobar – to track down the assassins of flight 229, the Pan Am Hawaii Clipper.

Steve Murphy and Javier Pena, Lead Investigators in search of The Lost Clipper
jeff-guy-javier-steve
Steve Murphy, Guy Noffsinger, Jeff Riegel, and Javier Pena (December 2015)

Guy has been on the trail for seventeen years and now with these two experts, a fourth trip to Micronesia could change history forever – telling the story of how fifteen passengers and crew became victims of a war crime well before there was ever a war and how the motive to steal new powerful engines and keep $3 million in gold from the hands of the Chinese would be one of the world’s most intriguing and unsolved aviation mysteries. Along the way, solving this mystery may even solve a greater historical mystery: the disappearance of Amelia Earhart.

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