An Update On An Old Story

About a year ago, we weighed in on the image taken on Jaluit Atoll that was reported as being of missing aviatrix Amelia Earhart and her navigator Fred Noonan.

Earhart on Jaluit Hawaii Clipper
Photographic evidence of Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan in the Marshall Islands found in the National Archives by Les Kinney. credit: Les Kinney/National Archives/HISTORY contact: , Kirby

The issue was that a blogger in Japan found the exact same image in a Japanese archive and that it was “stamped” 1935.  None of the photographs in this portfolio are dated and there are no dates in the book other than a stamp at the back of the book by a librarian who put it into the archive.

nannyouguntou

This revelation seemingly negated the relevance or date of this Office of Navy Intelligence (ONI) image and thus, torpedoes the whole concept .  Apparently the debunk-er has been debunked.   It appears now that the dock – to which Earhart and Noonan are allegedly standing on – was new AND the most likely reason the image was in an ONI file.  Not because of the shipping or people but that the pier / dock was brand new and would enhance the shipping capability of the port… something very important to know from an intelligence perspective.  In fact – here is what an official memo from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Marshall Islands had to say:

Jaluit Atoll DockSo basically, the Japanese Archive photo may have had a stamp saying 1935 on the album from which it came, but it does not mean the photo itself was taken in 1935 as it was not a published book.   Just like a photo album you may have at home might say 1990, it surely does not mean all the photos were taken before or after that date right?  Whats even more interesting is that the photo reveals the ship is indeed the Koshu and her logs say that she arrived in Jaluit on July 13, 1937 and then left for a short period (presumed to be the time it collected the barge and Earhart / Noonan) and then returned to Jaluit before departing port on July 19 for Truk Lagoon and Saipan.  Could Earhart and Noonan been on the slow boat to oblivion?

From Rich Martini’s website on the matter he further states that: “there’s the explorer Eric De Bisschop who sailed through the Marshalls in July 1937 (the 2nd) and he was arrested near Mili for doing so. His ship was searched, and he writes about it in his book about his Thor Heyerdahl adventures in a simply built boat.”

Here is what it reads:

Letter where De Bisschop (well known explorer) is asked about seeing Earhart on Jaluit. 

Transcribed: “In connection with the above” (see the transcript of the letter printed below) M. Hoppenot showed the writer the following statement made by M. Eric De Bisschop, a former French naval officer…”  after mentioning he’d sailed past Mila (sic) atoll, the Japanese turned hostile and searched his boat. “He was arrested, suspected of espionage, and given a severe and thorough questioning for several hours… (his ship the “Fou Po” was) searched from bow to stern.”)

“At Jaluit he had seen shells for 3-inch guns… the Japanese have dredged the harbor and entrance channels… much larger and freer from obstructions then are shown on current charts.” The charts are being held confidentially, not for “sale or distribution.”

He noticed “an airplane ramp..” an “airplane hangar… a concreted dock… radio transmitter…” He said “as to Mila (sic) dredging and building was going on… It is held so confidential that even Japanese merchant ships are not allowed to visit there… coal, 3″ shells, dynamite… are brought to Jaluit.. (then) by small navy transport” to Mila (sic) atoll.

(Part of the page torn away) “the story about Miss Earhart and other people kept… (n)er… is concerned, M. de Bisschop that while possible,… (torn). He said  that it was much easier to find someon(e)… ned then to keep them prisoners.  He had heard from… (torn) ‘efore his visit one such white skin man who had visited Jaluit… (torn) day but with indications that he had been struck over… (torn) e natives declared that this man was rumored to have been (torn).

(Logic tells us that Mr. De Bisschop said he had not seen her but that it was possible she had been there, that it was easier to arrest people than to “keep prisoners.”  And then he recounted a story of a man who had been beaten and possibly killed for being a spy.)”

rg-38-entry 81-a-4-3-earhart-2017-002_ac (2)

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